Shaikh al-Albaani

Translations From His Works

Tag: fasting

The Wisdom Behind Fasting


The Imaam said, “I start by opening with something appropriate to the time and place we’re in, in that we all know the Statement of Allaah تبارك و تعالى, “… decreed upon you is fasting as it was decreed upon those before you, that you may become righteous,” [Baqarah 2:183] you’ve heard commentary and beneficial comments concerning this verse and things connected to it many times, but I believe that you will have seldom heard commentary on its last part, “… that you may become righteous.”

Why was this fasting decreed? “That you may become righteous.” This is one of the rare verses, in fact one of the rare legislated provisions that links the legislated order with an explanation of the intended goal and the reason it was legislated.

There is a declaration here of the obligation of fasting Ramadan, and Muslims should apply themselves to adopting and implementing this order without asking why or how and so on, something which is common now in terms of questioning the legislated orders, [such that] you will often hear some people [saying], “Why this? Why that? Why this?”—we don’t approve of exhaustively searching for the wisdom behind legislation, except what has been expounded on [itself] in it, like what we’re discussing now [i.e., fasting].

“Decreed upon you is fasting,” why? He تعالى said, “… that you may become righteous,” i.e., the point of fasting is for it to be a means for the fasting person to increase his taqwa of Allaah عز وجل and for him to get closer to Him.

If he fasts but does not improve compared to how he was before, i.e., before Ramadan, then it means that this person has not accomplished the desired goal wanted from the implementation of fasting.

There are some authentic hadiths, from the Prophet ﷺ of course, which explain and confirm this objective which the verse has stated, for example, the hadith qudsi which the Prophet ﷺ relates from his Lord عز وجل, in which He said, “Whoever does not leave false speech, and acting according to it, then Allaah is not in any need of him leaving his food and his drink,” this is a very great hadith, and goes completely with the end of the verse, “… that you may become righteous.”

So, when we look at both the verse and the hadith, the aim is not—the only aim is not, and I [purposefully say] ‘the only aim’ so that some people don’t misunderstand me—the only aim for the fasting person is not to refrain from eating, drinking and intercourse based upon the fact that they are listed as things which break the fast in the Quraan and the Sunnah, (leaving aside [for now, mention of] the other things which also break it concerning which there is a big difference of opinion amongst the scholars of fiqh), the aim is not to only refrain from these things which break the fast, but rather [to be aware] that there are other obligatory things which a Muslim must stop himself from too just like he did with these things.

In light of the explanation mentioned in the verse and the clear, authentic hadith just now, I can say something to you which might be new in terms of how it’s expressed but is not new in the ahkaam because it is mentioned in the Quran and the Sunnah, this new phrasing is [concerning the fact] that the books of fiqh, without exception mention the things which break the fast, and this is something that must be done, but, to explain and clarify what was previously mentioned in the verse and the hadith, I say: those things which break the fast are of two types, and this correct division [which I am about to mention] must be rooted in everyone’s mind, because of how important it is.

The first type: the material things which break the fast, and they are the things listed in the books of fiqh as was mentioned just now.

The second type: let’s call them the abstract things which break the fast, these are the things that the verse referred to, “… that you may become righteous,” and his ﷺ statement from His Lord تبارك و تعالى clarified that, “Whoever does not leave false speech, and acting according to it, then Allaah is not in any need of him leaving his food and his drink.”

Thus, along with leaving his food, drink and intercourse, to that he must also add refraining from what Allaah عز وجل has forbidden and what He has ordered every Muslim to be far from.

From the Prophet ﷺ that he said, “Fasting is not leaving food and drink but rather fasting is refraining from what Allaah عز وجل has prohibited,” or as he ﷺ said in words of a similar meaning, and whoever wants to read these hadiths and those like it where the Prophet ﷺ warned the fasting person from committing sins and [where it shows] that this forbiddance comes under the generality of His Statement تبارك و تعالى, “… that you may become righteous,” whoever wants to read these types of hadiths should refer to At-Targheeb wat-Tarheeb of al-Haafidh al-Mundhiri, may Allaah have mercy on him.

To conclude I say, fasting, in terms of how it was legislated in order for a Muslim to get closer to Allaah and increase his taqwa of Him, is just like the prayer, prayer whose only purpose is also not that a Muslim just performs its conditions, pillars and requirements, but that he should also pay heed to the purpose and wisdom due to which Allaah عز وجل  legislated five of them, day and night, on His believing servants, that is what Our Lord عز وجل alluded to in His Statement, “Indeed, prayer prohibits immorality and wrongdoing …” [Al-Ankabut 29:45], so a Muslim’s prayer is accepted by Allaah عز وجل in accordance with how much it prevents him from immorality and wrongdoing.

The Prophet ﷺ pointed to this fact connected to prayer in an authentic hadith, where he ﷺ said, “Verily the slave prays a prayer of which nothing is written down for him …” i.e., completely, but rather it is written as deficient according to how discrepant it is, he ﷺ explained that in the rest of the hadith where he said, “Verily the slave prays a prayer of which nothing is written down for him except a tenth, a ninth, an eighth, a seventh, a sixth, a fifth, a quarter, a third or half of it,”—and he stopped here, indicating that a complete prayer is very, very rare, a Muslim is not able to perform it, the best of them is the one for whom half is written and so on until a tenth, and [even then] a tenth is only if the prayer is [actually] accepted by Allaah عز وجل, otherwise many of a person’s prayers are those which he will have his face struck with on the Day of Judgement, and refuge is sought with Allaah, and that is because the Prophet ﷺ pointed to two realities.

The first is what we have spoken about connected to fasting, and the other is connected to prayer, for he ﷺ said, “How many a fasting person there is who has nothing but hunger and thirst from his fasting,” why? Because he never stopped doing what Allaah عز وجل forbade him from, he [i.e.,, this fasting person] only restricted himself to what we [earlier] called the material things which break the fast—yet he thinks he is fasting—about such a person we say, “He fasted but didn’t fast,” he fasted in terms of refraining himself from the material things which break the fast but he didn’t [really] fast because he didn’t withhold from the abstract things which break the fast, that is why he ﷺ said, “How many a fasting person there is who gets nothing but hunger and thirst from his fast, and how many a praying person there is who gets nothing but a sleepless night and fatigue from his standing in prayer.”

So, we hope that Allaah تبارك و تعالى inspires us to refrain from both types of thing which break the fast, the material and the abstract, and that He inspires us [to perform] prayers that are accepted by Him تبارك و تعالى, prayers which prevent one from immorality and wrongdoing.”

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 692.

Al-Albaani On Whether Long Fasting Hours Should Be Shortened


Questioner: The Muslims in Sweden, a European country, in Ramadaan they have only three hours to eat after opening their fast, i.e., the sun sets at ten o’clock and rises at one.

Al-Albaani: Where?

Questioner: In Sweden.

Al-Albaani: In Sweden, yes.

Questioner: Yes there are Muslims …

Al-Albaani: Yes … yes ma’roof.

Questioner: They only have three hours during which to eat, and they fast for twenty-one, so they find it difficult. One brother told me that some people gave them a fatwa that they can start and break the fast according to the time in Makkah, so this fatwa ya’ni

Al-Albaani: I don’t hold … I don’t hold this fatwa to be correct. Since we can flip the situation and say that a season will come where the situation will be the opposite, where they will fast for three hours or thereabouts and they will be able to eat for the remainder of those twenty four hours, clear?

Questioner: I don’t think …

Al-Albaani: Have you studied any geography?

Questioner: No, only a little.

Al-Abaani: Do you know that the sun, ya’ni, is hidden in the North Pole for half the year such that they don’t see it, and in the other half it’s the opposite of that totally, are you aware of that or not?

Questioner: My hold on geography [is weak], O Shaikh.

Al-Albaani:  So you don’t know that, it is something well-known.

Questioner: Yes.

Al-Albaani: And [then] between this and that [i.e., between the North and South poles] you have seasons in those countries, ya’ni, in the two poles you have night for half the year and day for half, [it is] in such a situation [that] the question as to what should be done is posed.

But those who are closer to us, [closer] to the equator, the closer they get to us the more uniform time becomes for them, you know that at the equator day and night are totally equal?

Questioner: Yes.

Al-Albaani: Yes, but it changes totally the higher or lower you go, so that you get a period in those countries where instead of the twenty or twenty-one hours they fast and the three hours they can eat, about half a year later it’s the total opposite of that.

That’s why I say to them your account is being accumulated in terms of what is coming [i.e., a time will come when your fast will be very short], and I do not give them a fatwa that they should fast according to [the timings of] their neighbouring countries, because the [following] aayahs apply to them: And eat and drink until the white thread of dawn becomes distinct to you from the black thread [of night], [Baqarah 2:187] in contrast to those we told you about in the North Pole who do not see the sun at all, there is no morning, no ’ishaa, nothing, [it is] these people [who] estimate the value as has been clearly stated in the authentic hadith about the Dajjaal in which the Prophet ﷺ upon informing his Companions that the Dajjaal would be there for how many days? Thirty or forty?

Questioner: Forty.

Someone else: Forty days.

Al-Albaani: Forty days. One of his days will equal a year, the next a month, the third a week and the rest will be like these days of yours. The question arose as to how they should pray [during that time]? He said, “You must make an estimate of its extent.”

So, making an estimate in that long year, what will the Muslims want to base that estimate on? On what they were accustomed to.

Now with the presence of watches it is very easy for them to estimate … if we supposed that the Muslims had a year-long dark night such that day and night were combined [into one], which happens at the two poles as we mentioned, in such an instance they have to make an estimate.

As for every country in which the sun can be seen setting and rising, and what that results in in terms of fajr­—then these people have to fast even if the duration of the fast seems long to them, and our Lord عز وجل says in the Noble Quran: And if Allaah had willed, He could have put you in difficulty, [Baqarah: 2:220] [but] He didn’t will difficulty for us, alhamdulillaah.

If such a situation does occur in some countries then soon enough they will get copious amounts of ease in place of that increased discomfort [when the day becomes short and their fasting becomes easier].

This is my answer and it is correct, inshaa Allaah.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 237.

See part two here.

The Fast of ’Aashuraa and Responding to an Invite


Questioner: Ustaadh, supposing that it’s ’Aashuraa, the fast of [the Day of] ’Aashuraa, and a person close to you has called you over for lunch, if you don’t go, he’ll get upset, so should you take up his invite or complete your fast?

Al-Albaani: If you don’t go he’ll get upset?

Questioner: He’ll get upset.

Al-Albaani: Go, but if there’s no harm [in not going] and he won’t get upset then he supplicates for him and completes his fast.

Questioner: So ’Aashuraa is like other optional acts of worship.

Al-Albaani: Optional, but it has special merit.

Questioner: Responding to an invite is regarded as being obligatory?

Al-Albaani: Yes.

Questioner: When a Muslim invites you then you must respond to his invitation, so the thing which is obligatory is given precedence over that which is optional.

Al-Albaani: That’s it, but if he accepts the excuse then he supplicates for him and asks Allaah to forgive him, if he doesn’t accept [his refusal] then he goes.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 25/2.

An Abandoned Sunnah When Opening Fasts


 

“From Anas in marfoo’ form, ‘He used to open his fast with fresh dates before he would pray and if there were no fresh dates then he would open it with dry dates and if there were none then he would take a few sips of water.’

The Imaam said, ‘The purpose of me mentioning this hadith whilst being brief in a discussion of its chain of narration is only to remind people of this Sunnah which most of those who fast have neglected, especially during common invitations in which all manner of delicious and pleasant food and drink is prepared, but as for fresh dates or at the very least dry dates then they have no mention, and even worse than that is their neglect of breaking the fast with some sips of water—so glad tidings for whoever is from those, ‘who listen to speech and follow the best of it. Those are the ones Allaah has guided, and those are people of understanding.”” [Az-Zumar 39:18]

As-Saheehah, vol. 6/2/821.

The Importance of the Supplications of the Righteous


From Anas, “When he صلى الله عليه وسلم would strive in supplicating for someone he would say:

جَعَلَ اللهُ عَلَيْكُمْ صَلَاةَ قَوْمٍ أَبْرَار، يَقُوْمُوْنَ الْلَّيْلَ وَيَصُوْمُوْنَ الْنَّهَارَ، لَيْسُوْا بِأَثَمَةٍ وَلَا فُجَّارٍ

Jaʿalallāhu ʿalaikum ṣalāta qowmin abrār, yaqūmūnal-laila wa yaṣūmūna-nahāra laisū bi athamatin wa lā fujjār

‘May Allaah cause to be over you the prayers of a righteous people who stand [in prayer] at night and fast during the day, and who are neither sinners nor wicked evil-doers.’”

Silsilah | 1810 | Saheeh

His Worship and how many times he performed Hajj


Translated by Ahmed Abu Turaab

As-Sadhaan said, “The Shaikh, may Allaah have mercy on him, was from the most eager of people in ensuring that his worship was in accordance with the Sunnah, in its form, its amount and its time.  He was eager to implement the Sunnah in what he ate, drank and wore, and in his dealings [with the people].

Those who sat with him, visited him, or attended his lectures or gatherings which were full [of people] bear witness to that.  Such that Shaikh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-Uthaymeen, may Allaah have mercy on him, said, “That which I know about the Shaikh through the times I met him, and they were few, is that he was extremely eager to act upon the Sunnah, and to fight innovations, whether they were in matters of creed or action.”

And he would pray a lot of optional prayers and fast a lot also.

He would be affected very quickly and would cry easily, especially when listening to the Quraan or reciting it, or when listening to Prophetic sayings which contained a mention of a promise or threat, or when he would hear about the death of a scholar of hadith and the Sunnah, or when a good dream which someone saw about him would be mentioned to him, or when he would be praised or complemented.

He, may Allaah have mercy on him, would be eager to fast Mondays and Thursdays in summer and winter, except if he was travelling or ill.

When he would enter the mosque on Fridays he would continue to pray two units of prayer, followed by another two and so on [continually] until the Imaam would ascend onto the minbar.

He would perform Hajj and umrah every year if he was able to, and would sometimes perform umrah twice in one year.

He performed Hajj more than thirty times.

I was told that there was a man who was a worshipper who lived in close proximity to the Prophet’s Mosque, he was well-known for his righteousness, his abstinence, and was a person of the Sunnah who would very often give advice [to the people].

One time he saw some people who were doing a great deal of talking in the Prophet’s Mosque so he advised them to seize the opportunity to benefit from their time by reading the Quraan or remembering Allaah.

The people found his sincere speech to be pleasant and agreeable and he continued to speak to them. Those around him heard what he was saying and [heard] his pleasant words such that the number of people increased and he was speaking in a way which, inshaa Allaah, showed the truthfulness of his intention.

Then all of a sudden while he was speaking he fell totally silent and started to stare at one of the people present in the gathering and started to apologise [saying] that he did not know he was present.

But that person who had been affected by this man’s advice did nothing except ask this man to continue giving his reminder and advice–but the man sat down [instead].

The person who had asked him to continue in his advice was none other than Shaikh al-Albaani, may Allaah have mercy on him, [this was] when he was in Medinah as a teacher at the Islamic University.

Shaikh Muhammad Ziyaad at-Tuklah, may Allaah reward him, wrote to me saying, “I asked Shaikh Muhammad Eed al-Abbaasee about the worship of Shaikh al-Albaani so he said, ‘We would pray the night prayer [taraaweeh in Ramadaan] with some brothers. Shaikh al-Albaani would get up and lead us in a long prayer which would be almost three hours long. During it he would implement [even] the smallest of Sunnahs. He would make the bowing and prostration long.

The bowing [rukoo’] would be about eight to nine minutes long.

And when he would sit he would ask Allaah for forgiveness and praise him between every two rak’ahs. And one time Shaikh Ali Khashaan went up to him while he was in that state and asked him about an issue, so he replied, ‘Now is the time for worship, the time for knowledge is other than this.’

And because of how long the Shaikh would make the night prayer we would fear, as occurs in the hadith, that we might miss the suhoor meal. And when praying behind him we would feel tranquillity, devoutness [khushoo], and calmness.””

Al-Imaam al-Albaani, Duroos, wa Mawaaqif, wa Ibar, of Abdul-Aziz ibn Muhammad Abdullaah as-Sadhaan, pp. 88-89.

The Shaikh’s Life in his Own Words … 18


 

Our Call

1) To return to the Book and the authentic Sunnah, understanding it according to the methodology of the Pious Predecessors, may Allaah be pleased with them all.

2) To inform and make the Muslims acquainted with their religion of Truth, calling them to practising what it instructs and orders, to adorn themselves with its virtues and manners which will ensure that they earn the pleasure of Allaah, and will make happiness and glory a reality for them.

3) Warning the Muslims from associating partners with Allaah (shirk) in all its forms, from innovations and foreign ideologies, from munkar and fabricated hadiths which have disfigured the beauty of Islaam and has prevented the Muslims from progressing.

4) Reviving free Islamic thinking within the boundaries of the principles of Islaam, removing that rigid thinking which has pervaded and taken hold of the intellects of many of the Muslims and distanced them from the pure Islamic sources.

5) Striving to revive an Islamic way of life, establishing an Islamic society implementing the law of Allaah on earth. This is our call, and we call all the Muslims to support this trust that will raise them and spread the abiding message of Islaam.

Purification and Cultivation

From an ideological and knowledge-based perspective I regard the situation of the Muslims to be better than that of thirty to forty years ago. A quarter of a century ago we used to complain about the lack of Muslims studying modern sciences, it was what the reformers used to talk about.

Then the result of this movement was that the next generation turned to these sciences but at the same time almost totally turned away from the other side, and I mean by that the Islamic sciences, and that has many dangers on the fate of that generation.

As for the remedy to this predicament, then I believe that it rests on two points: purification and cultivation. By purification I mean cleansing Islaam from every thing foreign and all defects. The way to achieve that is firstly to purify the Sunnah from the fabricated and weak things that have penetrated it, and then to interpret the Quraan based upon this authentic Sunnah and the understanding and thinking of the Pious Predecessors.

By that I do not mean that we stop as regards tafseer at the limit the Salaf reached, but rather that we adhere to their methodology in tafseer, and in doing so there is a unity of direction and an obstruction to becoming separated.

This purification that I am referring to includes purifying that which has reached us as regards Islamic sciences and ideologies, so that we eject everything from it which opposes the sound methodology. It also includes purifying the Islamic ideology from all foreign defects which have crept into the ideology of present day Muslims by way of western education, especially the philosophy and educational training and skills,  fields through which it is possible to inject a great amount of poison into the Islamic ideology.

By cultivation I mean nurturing a generation upon the correct, authentic Islamic creed taken from the Book and the Sunnah. I make special mention of the nurturing of young children upon worship without excessive talk about the material benefits of worship as some do. So if such material benefits must be mentioned then they should be the last thing that it is fitting to mention.

I do not forget to mention Islamic legislation here, what I see fit is that this subject should be studied upon the foundation of complete submission to the order of Allaah and total trust in His Wisdom without too much mention of its material benefits, and by so doing the student is provided with an invincibility from all plots and an immunity from all poison.

Concerning this, I recall the incident of the Treaty of Hudaybiyyah and the importance of submitting to the judgement of Allaah and His Messenger.

His Eagerness to Implement the Sunnah

When I performed umrah during Ramadaan last year I went up to the top floor of the building in Madeenah in which I had gone to visit one of my friends to check the time for sunset since I was fasting. So the call to prayer was not given except thirteen minutes after sunset! As for Jeddah, then I went to the top of the building in which one of my in-laws lived so the sun had hardly set when I [immediately] heard the call to prayer and so I thanked Allaah for that.

Some of the Sunnahs he revived

The Sermon of Need (Khutbatul-Haajah):

Then Allaah, the Most High, granted me the ability such that I started using this khutbah in my lessons and my books, and I was able to spread it in the Islamic world through the treatise I wrote concerning it.  Many of those who loved the Sunnah responded to it, and all praise is for Allaah, especially the khateebs [preachers] in the mosques, since it had been abandoned before that.

Praying the Eed prayer in the Musallaa

From that was that the prayer of the two eeds was established in an outside area [musallaa] in Damascus, then our brothers in Aleppo revived it there, and then in other cities in Syria, and this Sunnah continued to spread until some of our brothers in Amman, Jordan revived it there too.

A funny story yet sad at the same time

I led the people in prayer for Fajr prayer on a Friday once in one of the villages of az-Zubdaani.  So after reciting al-Faatihah I read what I was able to from Surah al-Kahf [the Cave], because my memorisation of Surah as-Sajdah was not firm.  So when I said the takbir [i.e., Allaahu Akbar] for the bowing [rukoo] all of the people went straight into prostration!  Since they thought that I had in fact said the takbir for the prostration for recitation which occurs in Surah Sajdah [since the normal Imaam would read that Surah and that is what they were used to.]  But those who were immediately behind me noticed that I was bowing so they got up and joined me in that.

As for the ones who were behind the minbar and who could not see me, they remained in prostration until they heard me say, “Allaah has heard the one who praises him …” [Sami’allaahu liman hamidah] and so they broke their prayer and a clamour broke loose.  After I made the tasleem [i.e., said salaam to end the prayer] I admonished and reminded them of the obligation upon them to have khushoo [humility] in the prayer and to pay attention to what is being recited to them from the aayaat of [the Book of Allaah] and that their attention is not distracted in it to [their worldly things such as] farming or milking the animals!

Hayaatul-Allaamah al-Albaani, rahimahullaah, bi qalamihi, pp. 41-46.

The Shaikh’s Life in his Own Words … 12


Examples of his Patience

I caused myself to go hungry at the end of 1379 [1959 ce] for forty consecutive days–I did not eat any food during those days whatsoever, nothing but water entered my stomach.  That was in the desire to be cured from certain ailments, and [at the end of it] I was [indeed] cured from some but not others.  Before doing this I had sought a cure with some doctors for close to ten years without any apparent benefit.  I took away two tangible benefits from this forced hunger:

The first: the ability of a person to endure hunger for such a long period of time in opposition to what many people think.

The other: that going hungry can help in curing obesity related ailments as Ibn al-Qayyim, may Allaah have mercy upon him, mentioned, just as it can help with other illnesses as many people have [tried and] experienced.  Yet it does not help with all illnesses and with all body types, in contrast to what the author of the book, ‘Seeking Cures through Fasting,’ a European author, claimed.  And over all those endowed with knowledge is the All-Knowing.

His Father asking him about a Hadith

So I saw fit that I should speak about it, clarifying its defects–especially when the closest of people to me had asked me about it, and that was none other than my father, may Allaah have mercy upon him, and reward him on my behalf with the best of rewards.

Shaikh Mustafaa az-Zarqaa asking him about Hadiths

And this hadith was one of those that the noble teacher Mustafaa az-Zarqaa presented to me, desiring that I verify and check it, and this was on the 15th of the Islamic month of Jumaada ath-Thaani, 1371 which corresponds to the 12th of March, 1952.

His Journeys in Search of Knowledge

Egypt
During the short time that I spent in Cairo and Alexandria it was only possible for me to meet but a few of the people of knowledge and excellence, for example, the author of Islamic works Muhibbud-Deen al-Khateeb, Ustaadh Muhammad al-Ghazaali [who the Shaikh went on to refute later, translators note], Shaikh Abdur-Razzaaq Afeefi and Shaikh Abdul-Aziz ar-Raashid.

While I was in Cairo I would go–every time the opportunity presented itself–to Daar al-Kutub al-Misriyyah to study the manuscripts of the books of hadith there.  I did the same when I left it and went to Alexandria, going to its library known as Al-Maktabah al-Baladiyyah, and I received copious and important benefits from both of these libraries.  From this second library, I copied out with my own hand a treatise of al-Haafidh Ibn Hajr al-Asqalaani in which he checked and verified the hadiths which al-Haafidh al-Qizweeni brought in the book Masaabih as-Sunnah and he judged therein that they were fabricated.

Aleppo
For many years one of my habits had been that I would travel to Aleppo for a week every month, spending it, or the great majority of it, in its only library there which is full of manuscripts, called Maltabah al-Awqaaf al-Islaamiyyah.  So I would spend hours there every day studying its manuscripts, copying what was of importance from it for my knowledge-based projects.  In addition to that I would also study the Sunnah and its sciences with some of those who desired knowledge, giving them a number of lessons every week [that I was there].

His Journey to Baital-Maqdis [Jerusalem]

And I travelled to Jerusalem for the first time on the 23rd of the Islamic month of Jumaada al-Awwal, 1385 [September 1965 ce], when the governments of Jordan and Syria agreed to allow their residents to travel freely between both countries without a passport.  So I seized the opportunity and travelled and prayed in the Al-Aqsaa mosque.  I visited the Rock, just to see it, since it has no [specific] excellence [mentioned] in the light of the Sharee’ah, in contrast to what the majority of the people think and what the government advocates.

Spain
In the month of Rajab, 1392 which corresponds to August, 1972 [he travelled to] Andalus when he was called to attend a conference for the unity of Muslim students held in Granada.

Morocco
My first journey to Morocco was at the end of the fourth month [Rabee ath-Thaani] in the year 1396 [1976 ce].

Qatr
In the blessed month of Ramadaan in 1392 [1972 ce, I travelled to Qatr] and in early Rabee al-Awwal in the year 1402 [1982].

His Second Journey to the Emirates
I returned to it on the 29th of March 1985 with official permission, numbered 1094/i, then I left on the 5th of April 1985 as is recorded in my passport with number 284024 sr/77.

Hayaatul-Allaamah al-Albaani, rahimahullaah, bi qalamihi, pp. 22-26.

Silsilah| The Authentic Collection| No. 6


عَنْ مُحَمَّدِ ابْنِ جُحَادَةَ عَنْ رَجُلٍ عَنْ زَمِيْلٍ لَهُ مِنْ بَنِيْ الْعَنْبَرِ عَنْ أَبِيْهِ- وَكَانَ يُكَنَّى: أَبَا الْمُنْتَفِقِ- قَالَ أَتَيْتُ مَكَّةَ، فَسَأَلْتُ عَنْ رَسُوْلِ اللهِ – صَلَّى اللهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّمَ -؟ فَقَالُوا: هُوَ بِعَرَفَةَ، فَأَتَيْتُهُ؛ فَذَهَبْتُ أَدْنُوْ مِنْهُ فَمَنَعُوْنِيْ، فَقَاْلَ: “اُتْرُكُوْهُ “. فَدَنَوْتُ مِنْهُ، حَتَّى إِذَا اخْتَلَفَتْ عُنُقُ رَاحِلَتِهِ وَعُنُقُ رَاحِلَتِيْ، فَقُلْتُ: يَا رَسُوْلَ اللهِ! نَبِّئْنِيْ بِمَا يُبَاعِدُنِيْ مِنْ عَذَابِ اللهِ، وَيُدْخِلُنِيَ الْجَنَّةَ؟ قَالَ:(1- تَعْبُدُ (وَفِيْ رِوَايَةٍ: اُعْبُدُ) اللهَ وَلاَ تُشْرِكْ بِهِ شَيْئاً.2- وَتُقِيْمُ الْصَّلاَةَ الْمَكْتُوْبَةَ.3- وَتُؤَدِّيْ الْزَّكَاةَ الْمَفْرُوْضَةَ. 4- وَتَصُوْمُ رَمَضَاْنَ. 5- وَتَحُجُّ وَتَعْتَمِرُوَانْظُرْ مَا تُحِبُّ مِنَ النَّاسِ أَنْ يَأْتُوْهُ إِلَيْكَ؛ فَافْعَلْهُ بِهِمْ، وَمَا كَرِهْتَ أَنْ يَأْتُوْهُ إِلَيْكَ؛ فَذَرْهُمْ مِنْهُ

From Muhammad ibn Juhaadah, from a man, from a friend of his from Bani al-Anbar, from his father whose kunyaa was Abul-Muntafiq, who said, “I came to Makkah and asked about [the whereabouts] of the Prophet, صلى الله عليه وسلم, so they said, ‘He is at Arafah.’  So I went to him and tried to get close to him but they prevented me.  So the Prophet, صلى الله عليه وسلم, said, ‘Leave him.’ So I came close to him until our riding beasts were neck and neck and then I said, ‘O Messenger of Allaah!  Inform me of that which will distance me from the Fire and cause me to enter into Paradise?’  So he said, ‘1) That you worship (and in a narration there occurs, ‘Worship …’) Allaah and do not associate anything in worship with him; 2) establish the prescribed prayer, 3) give the obligatory zakaah, 4) fast Ramadaan, 5) and perform Hajj and Umrah, 6) and look at how you would like to be treated by the people and so treat them in that manner, and how you would not like to be treated by them, then [likewise], do not treat them in that manner.’”

As-Saheehah, no. 3508

The Shaikh’s Life in his Own Words … 5


 

Some of the Contention Faced by the Shaikh

“The first of these was when a group of Shaikhs, among them one whom it was thought would have been a help to the Salafi da’wah, set up a petition claiming therein that I was spreading a Wahhaabi da’wah to cause trouble amongst the Muslims.  So they started collecting signatures for the petition from the people and then submitted it to the Mufti of Syria.  He, in turn, passed it on to the chief of police who summoned me in and questioned me about the affair, until in the end it came to nothing.

One day a friend of mine who I used to study with asked me about a certain hadith concerning the reward of fasting, so I explained to him that [this particular] hadith was weak.  This friend had heard the hadith from the Imaam giving the Jumu’ah sermon quoting it as a proof on the pulpit and he could not help but go back to this Shaikh who had given the sermon to mention what he had come to know about the weakness of the hadith and the reference where that could be checked.  So as a result, the next Jumu’ah sermon of this Imaam was an attack on the way of the Salaf and he started to accuse those who followed it as being Wahhaabis, characterising this way as misguidance, warning the people from approaching them and calling on them to protect their children from its callers.  The people listening to this [second] sermon were not all equal in accepting or rejecting what he said, and as a result there was a lot of disorder and confusion.

Hayaatul-Allaamah al-Albaani, rahimahullaah, bi qalamihi, pp. 13-14.

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