Shaikh al-Albaani

Translations From His Works

Tag: jumu’ah

The ‘Sunnah Prayers’ on Jumu’ah


Questioner: As regards the Jumu’ah prayer, the mu’addhin gives the adhaan, then one prays the two rak’ah Sunnahs of Jumu’ah, is that allowed or not?

Al-Albaani: [You said], ‘Is it allowed?’ what are you referring to?

Questioner: The two rak’ahs

Al-Albaani: There are no Sunnah [rak’ahs] for Jumu’ah [prayer], Yaa akhi. The Jumu’ah Sunnah prayers which are well-known today amongst many people have no basis in the Sunnah, why?

I will relate a hadith from Sahih Bukhaari to you, the most authentic book after the Book of Allaah, with an authentic chain of narration from as-Saa’ib ibn Yazeed who said the adhaan in the time of the Prophet was the first adhaan only, when the Prophet would ascend the minbar the mu’addhin would give the adhaan, when he finished the Prophet would stand up and deliver the sermon. There was no room for Sunnah prayers before Jumu’ah

… the Sunnah on Jumu’ah that a Muslim must stick to is to go to the mosque early, the earlier the better, due to his saying , “Whoever goes during the first hour, then it is as though he has offered a camel as a sacrifice to seek the Pleasure of Allah, and he who goes at the second hour is like one who offers a cow to win the Pleasure of Allah, and he who comes at the third hour is like one who offers a ram with horns (in sacrifice) and he who comes at the fourth hour is like one who offers a hen, and he who comes at the fifth hour is like one who offers an egg,” so the earlier he is the better.

[So when he does finally] enter the mosque, whether it is early or later, he prays two rak’ahs, four, six, eight, without a limit, because these are called optional prayers [naafilah], these are not Sunnah prayers which the Prophet specified, no, and that’s why he said in an authentic hadith, “Whoever takes a bath on Friday, and bathes completely, and goes early, arriving early, and then prays as much as he wants, then sits close to the Imaam, and listens to him … except that he is forgiven whatever was between that Jumu’ah and the one after it.”

So this person who enters the mosque on Friday can pray as much as he is able to and according to how much energy he has, and how much time.

But as for what happens nowadays then that has no basis in the Sunnah at all. And that which happens nowadays … how did two adhaans come about?

In the time of ’Uthmaan ibn ’Affaan, Medinah expanded as its residents increased. When the Prophet first migrated to Medinah it was like a village/small town naturally, Islaam spread and the Companions started to come and take up residence there bit by bit. In the time of ’Uthmaan, may Allaah be pleased with him, ya’ni, during his khilaafah, Medinah, maa shaa Allaah, became a city, the capital of the Islamic state, and an idea came to him, and how good an idea it was, considering that even until today, as you know, Jumu’ah is only prayed in the Prophet’s Mosque, [this has changed now], they were like that in the time of the Prophet , and Abu Bakr and ’Umar and ’Uthmaan … but due to the the expansion of the buildings in Medinah the people who were outside Medinah and in the market called Az-Zawraa couldn’t hear the adhaan in the Prophet’s Mosque, so he made an adhaan there, so let us now [for argument’s sake] call this, ‘The second adhaan.’

… the first adhaan is the one which the Prophet established, and this [other] one is called the second adhaan because ’Uthmaan brought it after the first but he didn’t do so except for the people in the market to be able to hear that Jumu’ah prayer’s time has arrived, and that yallah, ‘Come to prayer,’—[so to reiterate] where did ’Uthmaan place this second adhaan? In the market, a well-known place in the books of hadith called, ‘Az-Zawraa.’

It carried on like this up until the time of Hishaam ibn ’Abdul-Malik al-Amawi, it seemed an idea to him to move the adhaan from Az-Zawraa to the mosque, and from that day the situation changed.

And as time passed, a gap appeared between the two adhaans and the people filled it with what they call, ‘The Sunnah prayers anterior to Jumu’ah,’ and these Sunnah prayers done before Jumu’ah have no validity, because in his time, the Prophet, as I told you occurs in Saheeh al-Bukhaari, used to leave his home and ascend the minbar and Bilaal would give the adhaan and when he would finish the adhaan the Prophet would start the khutbah, there was no place for two Sunnah rak’ahs let alone four …

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 3.

Questioner: … but today I prayed in a mosque in Al-Ashrafiyyah by my father’s house, everyone got up to pray except me, I stayed sitting, I stayed sitting and everyone else got up to pray, I had [already] prayed six rak’ahsya’ni before Jumu’ah and then sat down, [but] when they gave the adhaan all of them stood up and prayed [what they incorrectly think are the two Sunnah rak’ahs that one does after the adhaan] except me, they found what I did strange …

Al-Albaani: Inshaa Allaah, you’ll have been added to the strangers [al-ghurabaa]

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 253.

The Sunnah Prayers Which People Perform On Jumu’ah Before the Khutbah


 

Questioner: The Sunnah prayer before Jumu’ah?

Al-Albaani: There’s no basis for it.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 253.

Please read this post for a detailed explanation.

Should Someone who Catches the Tashahhud of the Jumu’ah Prayer, Having Missed Both Rak’ahs, Pray Four?


Questioner: A questioner asks: someone who catches the tashahhud of the Jumu’ah prayer, having missed both rak’ahs, should he pray four?

Al-Albaani: Yes, he prays four, and the explanation of that is in my well-known book, ‘Al-Ajwibah an-Naafi’ah ’an Asilati Masjidil-Jaami’ah.’

Su’aalaat, vol. 2, p. 365.

His Worship and how many times he performed Hajj


Translated by Ahmed Abu Turaab

As-Sadhaan said, “The Shaikh, may Allaah have mercy on him, was from the most eager of people in ensuring that his worship was in accordance with the Sunnah, in its form, its amount and its time.  He was eager to implement the Sunnah in what he ate, drank and wore, and in his dealings [with the people].

Those who sat with him, visited him, or attended his lectures or gatherings which were full [of people] bear witness to that.  Such that Shaikh Muhammad ibn Saalih al-Uthaymeen, may Allaah have mercy on him, said, “That which I know about the Shaikh through the times I met him, and they were few, is that he was extremely eager to act upon the Sunnah, and to fight innovations, whether they were in matters of creed or action.”

And he would pray a lot of optional prayers and fast a lot also.

He would be affected very quickly and would cry easily, especially when listening to the Quraan or reciting it, or when listening to Prophetic sayings which contained a mention of a promise or threat, or when he would hear about the death of a scholar of hadith and the Sunnah, or when a good dream which someone saw about him would be mentioned to him, or when he would be praised or complemented.

He, may Allaah have mercy on him, would be eager to fast Mondays and Thursdays in summer and winter, except if he was travelling or ill.

When he would enter the mosque on Fridays he would continue to pray two units of prayer, followed by another two and so on [continually] until the Imaam would ascend onto the minbar.

He would perform Hajj and umrah every year if he was able to, and would sometimes perform umrah twice in one year.

He performed Hajj more than thirty times.

I was told that there was a man who was a worshipper who lived in close proximity to the Prophet’s Mosque, he was well-known for his righteousness, his abstinence, and was a person of the Sunnah who would very often give advice [to the people].

One time he saw some people who were doing a great deal of talking in the Prophet’s Mosque so he advised them to seize the opportunity to benefit from their time by reading the Quraan or remembering Allaah.

The people found his sincere speech to be pleasant and agreeable and he continued to speak to them. Those around him heard what he was saying and [heard] his pleasant words such that the number of people increased and he was speaking in a way which, inshaa Allaah, showed the truthfulness of his intention.

Then all of a sudden while he was speaking he fell totally silent and started to stare at one of the people present in the gathering and started to apologise [saying] that he did not know he was present.

But that person who had been affected by this man’s advice did nothing except ask this man to continue giving his reminder and advice–but the man sat down [instead].

The person who had asked him to continue in his advice was none other than Shaikh al-Albaani, may Allaah have mercy on him, [this was] when he was in Medinah as a teacher at the Islamic University.

Shaikh Muhammad Ziyaad at-Tuklah, may Allaah reward him, wrote to me saying, “I asked Shaikh Muhammad Eed al-Abbaasee about the worship of Shaikh al-Albaani so he said, ‘We would pray the night prayer [taraaweeh in Ramadaan] with some brothers. Shaikh al-Albaani would get up and lead us in a long prayer which would be almost three hours long. During it he would implement [even] the smallest of Sunnahs. He would make the bowing and prostration long.

The bowing [rukoo’] would be about eight to nine minutes long.

And when he would sit he would ask Allaah for forgiveness and praise him between every two rak’ahs. And one time Shaikh Ali Khashaan went up to him while he was in that state and asked him about an issue, so he replied, ‘Now is the time for worship, the time for knowledge is other than this.’

And because of how long the Shaikh would make the night prayer we would fear, as occurs in the hadith, that we might miss the suhoor meal. And when praying behind him we would feel tranquillity, devoutness [khushoo], and calmness.””

Al-Imaam al-Albaani, Duroos, wa Mawaaqif, wa Ibar, of Abdul-Aziz ibn Muhammad Abdullaah as-Sadhaan, pp. 88-89.

The Shaikh’s Life in his Own Words … 5


 

Some of the Contention Faced by the Shaikh

“The first of these was when a group of Shaikhs, among them one whom it was thought would have been a help to the Salafi da’wah, set up a petition claiming therein that I was spreading a Wahhaabi da’wah to cause trouble amongst the Muslims.  So they started collecting signatures for the petition from the people and then submitted it to the Mufti of Syria.  He, in turn, passed it on to the chief of police who summoned me in and questioned me about the affair, until in the end it came to nothing.

One day a friend of mine who I used to study with asked me about a certain hadith concerning the reward of fasting, so I explained to him that [this particular] hadith was weak.  This friend had heard the hadith from the Imaam giving the Jumu’ah sermon quoting it as a proof on the pulpit and he could not help but go back to this Shaikh who had given the sermon to mention what he had come to know about the weakness of the hadith and the reference where that could be checked.  So as a result, the next Jumu’ah sermon of this Imaam was an attack on the way of the Salaf and he started to accuse those who followed it as being Wahhaabis, characterising this way as misguidance, warning the people from approaching them and calling on them to protect their children from its callers.  The people listening to this [second] sermon were not all equal in accepting or rejecting what he said, and as a result there was a lot of disorder and confusion.

Hayaatul-Allaamah al-Albaani, rahimahullaah, bi qalamihi, pp. 13-14.

He stood up and turned to the people …


 

“At Jumu’ah prayer the Imaam giving the sermon mentioned amongst other things the hadith, The believer to the believer is like a [solid] building, some [parts of it] support others …” [Bukhaari and Muslim] adding the word, ‘… solid …’ [which is not part of the narration].  So after the jumu’ah prayer ended Shaikh al-Albaani stood up and turned to the people and made clear the absence of the word ‘solid’ in the narration of the hadith and urged that the hadiths be narrated as they came without any additions.

So, by Allaah, his critique was better than the sermon itself.”

Muhaddithul-Asr, Muhammad Naasirud-Deen al-Albaani of Samir ibn Amin al-Zahraani, pp. 31-32.

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