Shaikh al-Albaani

Translations From His Works

Tag: prophet

Does the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم know the Unseen? A Long Discussion Concerning that | 1


Translated by Ahmed Abu Turaab

Questioner: Our Shaikh, I have a question if you would be so kind. It has been reported that the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم prayed the morning prayer one day and mounted the minbar and delivered a sermon up until the mid-day prayer. Then he prayed and [again] mounted the minbar, then he repeated that and so on. So he informed them about what was and what would be up until the Day of Judgement.  The Companion says, ‘He who memorized it, did so. And he who forgot it, did so. And I may pass by a matter and remember it just as a man remembers the face of another.’

So when Imaam al-Busiri said, ‘And from your knowledge is the knowledge of the Tablet and the Pen.’  So he said: he informed us of what was and what would be until the Day of Judgement and this corresponds to, ‘He said to it, ‘Write.’ It said, ‘What shall I write.’ He said, ‘Write that which will be until the Day of Judgement?’

Al-Albani: Firstly, alhamdulillaah, this hadith is authentic and is in Sahih Muslim.  Secondly, my brother, it is possible that what he spoke about in the phrase, ‘He informed us about what would happen until the Day of Judgement,’ were the momentous matters that would occur, and not the details which no man is able to grasp and comprehend no matter what knowledge or power he has been given by Allaah, the Blessed and Most High–meaning, by way of argument let me say [this] to you: it is possible that Allaah the Mighty and Majestic, chose his Prophet عليه الصلاة السلام with whatever He willed such that He really told him what is apparent in this authentic hadith, i.e., [He told him] what was and what would be until the Day of Judgement.  But how can that be when he is talking to people who are not Prophets or Messengers and their capacity is limited and they do not have that characteristic which our Lord the Mighty and Majestic chose for our Prophet عليه الصلاة السلام?

For this reason, may Allaah bless you, it is not permissible for us to understand the hadith … and I say that maybe what was just mentioned while we were eating applies now [too] … and I mention this example because reality will help us understand this authentic hadith.

When interpreting a saying of the Prophet عليه السلام it is not allowed to stop at that hadith alone, but rather we have to extend our scope and look at other hadiths too. And will it help us to understand this authentic hadith with the expansive, general, encompassing meaning that occurs in the Most High’s Saying, “… leaves nothing small or great except that it has enumerated it,” [Kahf 18:49] or is the meaning [of the hadith] more limited than that?

Just now we spoke when we were eating, someone asked a question about a hadith in which the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم said, “Whoever takes a loan and his intention is to pay it back, and then is unable to do so, Allaah will clear it on his behalf on the Day of Judgement.” I say that this is an authentic hadith, and it explains that other hadith–and herein lies the point–he عليه السلام said, “The martyr is forgiven all sins except debt.” So shall we explain this hadith, “ … except debt …” … [to mean that] the martyr [who] dies and has a debt is not forgiven this sin even if he had intended to pay it back?  We say: no, because the first hadith explains and makes specific the [meaning intended in] the second hadith.

This hadith of yours resembles this second hadith [just mentioned in the example of the martyr], by Allaah, this is something very, very dangerous, this person fought in the Way of Allaah and died in the Way of Allaah and his sin is not forgiven because he died owing money to some Muslims?  No, this [hadith] is not to be understood as something in [such a] general, encompassing sense but is specified to mean if he did not intend to pay back the right to its owner.

This is the exact example of what we are talking about now: there is no doubt that from the hadith which you mentioned we understand that Allaah taught the Prophet عليه السلام every small or great thing as He said, “… leaves nothing small or great except that it has enumerated it,”–but no, this is not correct.

Rather the meaning of the hadith is that He taught him essential, fundamental things like the major signs of the Hour and [other] things similar to that like the minor signs which it is important for the Muslims to be familiar with, as Allaah the Most High, said in the noble Quraan, “[He is the] Knower of the unseen, and He does not disclose His [knowledge of the] unseen to anyone, except he whom He has approved of [from the] messengers …” [Jinn 72:26-27].

Does the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم know the Unseen and what is the Ruling Concerning Praying Behind Someone who Believes that?


Questioner: An Imaam of a mosque claims that the Prophet of Allaah صلى الله عليه وسلم knows the Unseen, so is it permissible to pray behind him?

Al-Albani: The texts of the Quraan regarding this topic are explicit in stating that the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم does not know the Unseen, as occurs in His Saying, the Most High, “If I had the knowledge of the Unseen [Ghaib], I should have secured for myself an abundance of wealth, and no evil should have touched me.” [Al-A’raaf 7:188]

And likewise, the hadiths reported in this regard confirm this meaning.  Such as the hadith in Sahih Bukhari that the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم passed by a little girl who was singing [lines of elegiac poetry] and was saying, ‘Among us is a Prophet who knows what will happen tomorrow.’  So he صلى الله عليه وسلم said, ‘Leave this (saying) for none knows the Unseen except Allaah and carry on saying the like of what you had been saying before,’ i.e., the permissible things.

So when that Imaam is informed [about this issue] but still insists on his misguidance, then it is not allowed to pray behind him, yes.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, no. 19.

Here’s the video a brother made of this post, jazaahullaahu khairaa:

The Shaikh’s Life in his Own Words … 14


 

 

His Advice to the Ummah

“I advise the Ummah to return to holding firm to its religion, the Book of its Lord, and the authentic Sunnah of it’s Prophet, acting upon it in all aspects of life, shrouding itself in its excellence and manners, and that it judges everything that it takes as religion against the Book of Allaah and the Sunnah of His Messenger, holding firm to what agrees with them both and disregarding whatever opposes them.  Since the affair is as the great Imaam Maalik ibn Anas, the Imaam of the place of hijrah [i.e., Medinah] said, “Whoever introduces an innovation into Islaam believing it to be good, has assumed that Muhammad, صلى الله عليه وسلم, betrayed [his delivery of] the Message.  Read the saying of Allaah, the Mighty and Majestic, ‘This day, I have perfected your religion for you, completed My Favour upon you, and have chosen for you Islaam as your religion.’  And the latter part of this nation will not be rectified except by that which rectified its first part.

Al-Albaani was not the head of any Sect or Group

The article [an article written by a minister in one of the Emirates and which was then circulated in a number of newspapers like Al-Bayaan and which threw many accusations against the Salafis (compiler’s footnote)]  did not  suffice with this allegation [alone], but rather added another to it, which related to me personally and which was more manifest in its falsehood than its previous allegations, so it mentioned, “And a person by the name of Naassirud-Deen al-Albaani heads it.”

So this is a lie and total falsehood, and everyone who knows me personally bears witness to that.  For verily my  devotion to authoring written works and checking and verifying for more than half a century comes between me and this alleged headship.  And this would have been if my soul inclined towards that, then how can it be when it is in direct opposition to my natural disposition which inclines to a knowledge-based approach?!

The Musnad of Abu Ya’laa.

“… Then I completed reading it in its entirety.”

I found the second volume of it in the general library in Ribat, I read it and benefitted from it and that was during my first journey to Morocco at the end of the fourth month in the year 1396 [1976 ce].

Praying the Istikhaara Prayer when making a Judgement on a hadith

So [concerning the hadith in question] I prayed to Allaah, the Most High, for guidance [Istikhaarah] and then placed it here [i.e., in his book As-Saheehah] due to its being strengthened when all of its varying paths of narration are taken into consideration.”

 Hayaatul-Allaamah al-Albaani, rahimahullaah, bi qalamihi, pp. 28-30.

Silsilah| The Authentic Collection| No. 1


 

Manners, Righteousness and
Keeping Ties of Kinship


آخَى – صلى الله عليه وسلم – بَينَ الزُّبَيرِ وبَينَ عَبْدِ اللهِ بْنِ مَسْعود

From Anas, who said, “The Prophet, صلى الله عليه وسلم, formed a pact of brotherhood between Ibn Mas’ood and az-Zubair.”

As-Saheehah, no., 3166 | authentic

Shaikh al-Albaani said, “Ibn Abdul-Barr said, ‘The pact of brotherhood occurred two times: once between the Muhaajirs specifically and that was in Makkah, and once between the Muhaajirs and the Ansaar.’  And from the proofs of this first pact of brotherhood is this authentic hadith, because az-Zubair and Ibn Mas’ood were both Muhaajirs as is well known.  It seems that Shaikhul-Islaam Ibn Taymiyyah, may Allaah have mercy upon him, did not come across this hadith and others like it, since he denied this [first] brotherhood (11/99-100), al-Haafidh Ibn Hajr mentioned this and refuted that opinion based on this hadith and others.”

Shaikh al-Albaani on blind following


The First Question

Is it permissible for the student of knowledge to suffice with the declarations of the scholars of the past as to whether a saying of the Prophet, صلى الله عليه وسلم, is weak or authentic? For example, he reads the checking of Haafidh al-Iraaqi where he says, “This hadith is authentic.” So is it permissible for him to suffice with that and the same with Imaam Ahmad or other than him?


Shaikh al-Albaani: “This matter resembles blind following in Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh). It is sufficient for the student of knowledge to listen to and act upon an opinion of one of the Imaams who are followed, and by that I do not only mean the four [famous ones], since there are more, by the Grace of Allaah, the Mighty and Majestic.

We say: [This is so] since it is not possible for all students of knowledge to be on the same level of ability in discerning the truth in those matters where the people have differed. So it is enough for the student of knowledge to implement the aayah, “So ask those who know the Scripture if you know not.” [Surah an-Nahl (16): 43]

So if there are people of knowledge who are alive then he should ask them and embrace their answer, and if there is not a scholar who is alive for him to question, and he knows that a certain scholar from those who are followed has a certain opinion then he can follow him. And in this he is safe from any reproach or blame even if in reality the opinion that he followed is a mistake because he has implemented what was mentioned in the aayah as being obligatory upon him, “So ask those who know the Scripture if you know not.”

But this is based upon certain premises–there is one condition to this, which is that it is not evident to him that the opinion he is following is a mistake. And knowing whether the opinion he is following is incorrect or not can be done by the student doing some personal research if he has the capability of doing so, or it can become known by the direction of another scholar whom he trusts and in whose knowledge he trusts. What is important is that it is permissible for the student of knowledge to blindly follow a scholar if the mistake [in that opinion] is not clear to him and he himself is not capable of clarifying whether [the chosen opinion] is correct or incorrect …” [1]

[[1] Footnote here by Amr Abdul-Mun’im Salim the one who compiled and explained the book the question is taken from, he said, “In other words, that he should not take this blind following to be religion. Rather whenever the mistake of the scholar or the Imaam becomes clear to him, it is obligatory for him to shun the opinion in which he is mistaken, whether it is with regard to matters of rulings or the creed, or that which is particular to declaring hadiths to be authentic or weak. And Shaikh al-Albaani has another very important religious verdict [fatwaa] concerning this topic in the book, Fataawaa Madinah, no., 32 on pages 42-43 …”] [it has been translated and can be read below after this answer].

Shaikh al-Albaani continues, “Likewise, totally, is the answer regarding the student of knowledge, he finds an Imaam from the Imaams of the Muslims or a preserver of hadith who authenticates hadith and declares others to be weak, then it is sufficient for this student of knowledge to follow this verifier [who declares hadiths to be authentic or weak] as long as two conditions are met, just as we have mentioned regarding the issue of [blind following] in fiqh:

1) The first condition: That he does not know it to be a mistake, since what is intended by this condition–whether it is hadith or fiqh–is that he does not follow his desires and thus say, “So and so gave me this religious verdict and the matter is closed …” [even though while saying this in reality] he feels some uneasiness in his soul, and the Prophet, صلى الله عليه وسلم, said, “Question your heart even if the mufti gives you his fatwa.” [2]

[[2] Footnote of Amr Abdul-Mun’im Salim, “Reported through different paths of narration the most authentic of which is the one reported by Imaam Ahmad (17922) with an authentic chain of narration from the hadith of Waabisah ibn Ma’bad, may Allaah be pleased with him, and the relevant part of that hadith is, “Righteousness is that which gives delight to your heart and sin is that which wavers in your heart, even if the people give you religious verdicts [fatwaas] concerning it.” ]

Shaikh al-Albaani continues, “This is the first condition, i.e., that he does not know that the opinion is a mistake–whether it is regarding the declaration of a hadith to be authentic or weak, or whether it is regarding the permissibility of something or its forbiddance.

2) the second condition: That he himself is not capable of verifying the authenticity or inauthenticity of the particular hadith in question, so this is something permissible–since we cannot burden all of the people [by saying that they must] become capable of reaching the level of ijtihaad or that they become scholars.” [3]

[[3] Footnote here by Amr Abdul-Mun’im Salim who said, “That is because if someone reaches the level of being capable of making ijtihaad and he acquires the tools of this knowledge, then it is not permissible for him to blindly follow anyone rather it is then obligatory upon him to make ijtihaad in the declaring of hadiths to be authentic or weak, but it is permissible for him to look at the rulings of the Imaams and the criticisers of hadith to pick from them that which is in accordance with the truth, so that he does not isolate himself with his opinion from their opinion.”]

 

The Second Question

“What is the proof concerning the forbiddance of blind following?”


Shaikh al-Albaani said, “I do not know of any proof that states that blind following is haraam, rather blind following is a necessity for the one who has no knowledge. And Allaah, the one free from all defects and the Most High, said, “So ask those who know the Scripture if you know not.” Therefore, this aayah placed the Muslims into two categories as regards knowledge:

i) the scholar and it made obligatory upon him to answer the questioner
ii) those who do not know, and it made asking the scholars obligatory upon them.

So if a person from the common folk came to a scholar and asked him about something and the scholar answered him, then this man has implemented the aayah.

And maybe what is intended is something other than what was mentioned in the question [directed to me] and that is the forbiddance of actively splitting into sects and groups; i.e., that a person take his religion from one of schools of thought that are followed and then he totally [refuses] to look at what the other schools of thought might say or at what the sayings of other scholars are–so it is this blind following of schools of thought which is then taken as religion that is not permitted because it opposes the proofs from the Book and the Sunnah.

And the people of knowledge place the people into three categories:

1) the mujtahid
2) the follower on clear proof and insight and
3) the blind follower, and it is this category that most of the people fall into.

As such we cannot say that, “Blind following is haraam,” [that] is only when blind following is taken as religion, as for blind following in general then it is not permissible to declare it to be forbidden.” [1]

[[1] Footnote here by Amr Abdul-Mun’im Salim who said, “And what has been said here is also said concerning taking the opinion of a scholar concerning the declaration of a hadith to be weak or authentic, with the condition that the status/rank of that scholar in relation to that knowledge be borne in mind. So such declarations of whether a hadith is authentic or weak are not taken from a scholar of fiqh who does not know [the science of] hadith criticism. Just as the declaration of whether a hadith is authentic cannot be relied upon when it comes from someone among the scholars of hadith or the hadith preservers who is known as being lenient; just as it is not possible to take the declaration that a hadith is weak from someone is known as being overly-strict. In fact this is a correct rule [established] by those known for their moderation and justice along with their knowledge of the principles of this profession and who are known for their practise of it which established their ability to exercise their judgement in arriving at a religious ruling [ijtihaad] concerning the criticism and chains of narration and their texts.”]

Taken from Al-Fataawaa al-Kuwaitiyyah, compiled by Amr Abdul-Mun’im Saleem, pp. 81-83.

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