Shaikh al-Albaani

Translations From His Works

Tag: salaam

On Giving Salaam When Entering the Mosque


Questioner: [When someone enters the mosque does he give salaam to the people around him only or should he raise his voice] so that everyone can hear him?

Al-Albaani: I hold the first situation [to be correct], because the basic principle regarding someone who enters the mosque is that he does not disturb anyone, so if he must give salaam—and [indeed] he must—then to those around him.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 250.

“Allaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahu Akbar.”


Questioner: … we want a clarification about something which we have become used to or which we see in our country, i.e., lengthening the takbeer [i.e., saying, ‘Allaahu Akbar,’ in the prayer] and making it different in length according to the different pillars [of the prayer one happens to be performing at the time], like the standing or the opening takbeer [to start off the prayer], or the middle or final tashahhud, and so on.

Al-Albaani: This is an issue which in reality we are not familiar with as being from the Sunnah, even though it has been mentioned in some of the books of fiqh, specifically Shaafi’i fiqh.

And if I, as is said, were to forget I [still] won’t forget an Imaam with us in Damascus who used to pray in the mosque and who was my shop’s neighbour, he was bigoted towards his Shaafi’i madhhab and would say, and I don’t mean Imaam ash-Shaafi’i would say but rather some of his followers, [that] the Imaam should extend the takbeer from pillar to pillar [in the prayer].

So if he wants to prostrate after having raised his head from rukoo’ he should carry on saying, “Allaaaaaaaahu Akbar,” until he puts his head on the ground in prostration, and this [extension] is somewhat acceptable in terms of how long it is, but what grabs one’s attention totally are two things: the Shaafi’i madhhab … this issue [of prolonging the takbeer] we do not know it to be from the Sunnah … but they have another point which is from the Sunnah and which they are envied for, and that is, ‘the sitting at ease,’ and you know that, ‘the sitting at ease,’ is when the person who is praying does not stand up from the second prostration to go into the second rak’ah in one whole movement as the Hanafis and others do, but that he should [instead] sit as though he has forgotten [to get up], [just] as one would do if you had forgotten and you [instead] stayed sitting for the tashahud, but this sitting is short and then he gets up resting on his hands, the Shaafi’i madhhab holds this view.

So the thing which grabs one’s attention and which was what I saw that Imaam doing, and subhaanallaah, he was a giant, obese guy, so he had hardly raised his head from the second sajdah when he started saying, “Allaaaaaaaaaaaaaa …” and he sat down for the sitting of ease all the while continuing to extend [saying] it until he stood up straight—imagine how long he would’ve had to extend his voice, maa shaa Allaah and he had two really big lungs [Shaikh starts laughing] … saying, “Allaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaahu Akbar,”—this has no basis in the Sunnah, rather the takbeer is short and concise …

… what can we do, talking about such things will lead us to talk about other [connected] issues so don’t blame us [since now following on from what I said about the takbeer, I will mention that concerning] … the salaam too, many of the Imaams make a mistake [when saying it, since they say], “As-Salaamu alaikum wa rahmatullaaaaaaaaaaaaaah,” this is a mistake, [and what happens is that] he will not have finished saying the salaam but the people praying behind him will have, the opposite to what happened in the first example.

Why? Because he carried on prolonging it, and this is in opposition to the Sunnah, the Sunnah is that he makes it succinct, “As-Salaamu alaikum wa rahmatullah,” there is no need to prolong it, because it puts the people who are following him in a fix such that they end up saying the tasleem, which is the final pillar of the prayer, before him.

So, all of the takbeers of the prayer are like one another, there is no extending or prolonging them, whether that be when getting up from the second prostration to go in to the second rak’ah or when standing up from rukoo’ and so on, the takbeer [is simple], “Allaahu Akbar,” and it’s over.

And up to here is enough.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 532.

Al-Albaani Asked About Replying to The Salaam of Someone Who Doesn’t Pray


Questioner: A person who doesn’t pray walks past you and says, ‘As-Salaamu ’alaikum,’ do you reply to his salaam?

Al-Albaani: Yes, you give salaam back, but when you accompany him you admonish him.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 97.

Are The Prostrations for Forgetfulness Done Before or After the Salaam?


 

Questioner: A person catches one rak’ah of Fajr prayer, but he forgetfully gives salaam along with the Imaam, should the prostrations for forgetfulness be done before or after the salaam?

Al-Albaani: [Firstly] he doesn’t prostrate for forgetfulness until he has separated from the Imaam. When he forgets if he wants to he can prostrate before the salaam or after it, the well-known elaboration that if he added something to the prayer then it is … after and vice-versa, some of the hadiths serve as evidence for this elaboration but when all of them are brought together it becomes clear that the person who is forgetful in his prayer has the option of either giving salaam [and then prostrating] and that is better outright, or if he wants to he can give salaam after he finishes the prostrations for forgetfulness.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 259.

Al-Albaani Asked: When Does One Perform the Prostrations of Forgetfulness [Sujood as-Sahw], Before or After Salaam?


 

Questioner: What is the most correct opinion regarding the prostrations of forgetfulness? [Should they be done] before or after [the salaam]?

Al-Albaani: Both are allowed.

Questioner: And the hadith in which the Prophet ﷺ said, “For each forgetfulness there are two prostrations after giving the salutation?” [Saheeh Abu Dawud, no. 954, Hasan]

Al-Albaani: There are other hadiths which permit the prostration before the salaam, and that is why I said both are allowed.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 338.

When Does a Person Praying Behind an Imaam Start to Give Salaam? After the First or Second Tasleem?


Questioner: When giving salaam at the end of the prayer, is it allowed for me to give salaam behind the Imaam to the right and then to the left or do I have to wait until he’s finished giving salaam on both sides [before I start]?

Al-Albaani: This is a good question. You shouldn’t wait for his second salaam, because one exits the prayer through the first, i.e., the first salaam [to the right] is the one that is the rukn out of the two, the second one [to the left] is a Sunnah, if he does it, you do it, and if he doesn’t you don’t and along with him you are content with that first salaam.

What the people do nowadays in terms of waiting for the Imaam until they hear him finish the second salaam and then they follow him by doing the first and second tasleem, this goes against the most correct opinion in this issue.

Al-Hudaa wan-Noor, 328.

What to Say to Jesus, peace be upon him, If You Meet Him


مَنْ أَدْرَكَ مِنْكُمْ عِيْسَى ابْنَ مَرْيَمَ، فَلْيَقْرَئْهُ مِنِّي السَّلَامَ

Anas, may Allaah be pleased with him, said that the Prophet صَلَّى اللهُ عَلَيْهِ وَسَلَّمَ said, “Whoever amongst you meets Jesus the son of Mary, then convey [the greeting of] salaam to him from me.”

Silsilah 2308 | Jayyid

“Why does he not give salaam …?”


 

“One day we were in a lecture being held at someone’s house. Whenever the owner of the house would come in or leave he would not give salaam assuming that by doing so he would be disturbing the lesson.  So the Shaikh turned to him and asked, “Why does he not give salaam when he enters and leaves?”  And so the lesson changed topic and ended up being about the manners concerning giving salaam when entering and leaving and the manners of seeking permission and so on.”

Muhaddithul-Asr, Muhammad Naasirud-Deen al-Albaani of Samir ibn Amin al-Zahraani, p. 31.

From the rulings concerning giving salaam


Question: When someone says, “As-Salaamu alaikum,” do we add, ‘… wa barakaatuhu …’ when replying to him?

Answer: Yes.  There is nothing to stop you saying up to wa barakaatuhu.  And the order is not a condition, i.e., when someone says to you, “As-Salaamu alaikum,” you have the option of saying, “Wa alaikum salaam wa rahmatullaah” or “Wa alaikum salaam wa rahmatullaahi wa barakaatuhu.”

I (Shaikh Ali Hasan) asked: As for saying, “… wa maghfiratuhu …” [after wa barakaa-tuhu] then it is not said unless the person says upto wa barakaatuhu?

Shaikh al-Albaani:  Yes.

Shaikh Ali Hasan said in a footnote to the above, “And whoever reports that the Shaikh retracted from his stance about the correctness of the addition, “… wa maghfiratuhu …” when returning the greeting of salaam then he is mistaken!  Yes, the Shaikh retracted from his statement that the chain of the narration was saheeh li-dhaatihi but he declared it to be hasan due to its supporting narrations, so pay heed to that, may Allaah have mercy upon you.  [And that is] just as I read, in his own handwriting, may Allaah have mercy upon him, in his notes to the third volume of Silsilah as-Saheehah, hadith number 1449.”

Su’aalaat of Shaikh Ali Hasan al-Halabi, vol. 2, p. 567, no. 393

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